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About me

01.

I introduce myself

Hi, my name is Sergio Junior Franco (I know it's strange, don't worry about it!). I was born in 1971.

As a child, whenever I went out I wanted to know what was around every corner ...

02.

My mission

My mission is to look for places other than the well-known ones which all types of tourism focus on.

I want to do justice to these places as they have just as much to offer...

03.

My philosophy

The slow life has become a necessity for me, to heal from the frenzy of modern society.

Living slowly and savouring every moment of the day has become my philosophy of life; it's very important because ...

04.

My Bike

Like almost every boy of my generation, my main objective as a 14-year-old was to have a ``moped`` and then move on to a real bike.

01.

A nomad spirit

Hi, my name is Sergio Junior Franco (I know it’s strange, don’t worry about it!). I was born in 1971.

As a child, whenever I went out I wanted to know what was around every corner. I had an ever-growing curiosity about unknown places.

I was driven by the desire to discover things. Over the years this desire grew but, as I couldn’t travel and learn about the world, this desire turned into restlessness.

Whenever I saw a new road I’d wonder where it ended up, so I’d turn into it.

I lived quite contentedly for many years until 2006, when a series of events, that I’m not going to list here, pushed me to go on a solo journey with my bike of the time. I needed to take time for myself, alone, to “breathe” in every sense of the word.

Never was a decision more unlucky, in the full sense of the word. It was a rotten trip; I kept getting lost because I was using old maps and after it, with a tent, a bedroll and a loaded bike, my instinct resurfaced with full force and tormented me.

When, a day late, I got back, stopped in front of the garage door and got off the bike, I looked at it and a voice inside me shouted: “Turn the bike round and start again”.

I didn’t leave immediately as there were too many things to arrange. Now I’m ready. Follow me!

02.

Constantly searching for precious places

My mission

My mission is to look for places other than the well-known ones which all types of tourism focus on.

I want to do justice to these places as they have just as much to offer.

Although I prefer little-known places, I can’t ignore the famous sites. All the sites are important and my itineraries combine them with lesser-known ones.

My second purpose is to guide inquisitive tourists who wants to understand what they’re visiting better; its architectural, cultural, historical and spiritual value.

My mission starts in Italy, which has a large number of UNESCO heritage sites, some of which are little visited. I will then expand my horizons, and yours, to beyond the Italian border. Let’s go!

03.

The concept of Slow Life

My philosophy

The slow life has become a necessity for me, to heal from the frenzy of modern society.

Living slowly and savouring every moment of the day has become my philosophy of life; it’s very important because it improves the quality of life.

The articles I write contain a bit of the Slow Life; visiting any place or site takes time and it’s better to spend that time well.

04.

The evolution during the years

My bike

Like almost every boy of my generation, my main objective as a 14-year-old was to have a “moped” and then move on to a real bike.

You can see the vehicles I used when I was learning to drive on two wheels, and those I used to develop and improve my driving, below.

You don’t become a professional driver overnight. To drive like I do now, you have to humbly put yourself to the test and learn day by day. As my father, a long-distance lorry driver with never an accident to his name, used to say: “When you drive, you’re always learning, all the time”. Thanks dad.

Rizzato Califfo Deluxe

Every biker has a “first” and a “last” bike. I started with this 50-cc moped. It was all I had, and I was ashamed when I was with friends who had better bikes, but it was reliable so I was OK for me.

It was my mother’s and I borrowed it but I wanted a bike of my own.

Garelli Cyclone 5 speed

After two years I got this moped with which I learned how to use the gearbox and learned the first rudiments of maintenance and how to brake.

My first trips out of town took me more than 40 km away. I don’t know if it was courage or recklessness, but I always returned home.

After selling it, I realised that driving a car was not so practical so I went back to looking for another bike.

Piaggio Vespa ET3 125

A year and a half of total driving pleasure, used to do everything: to go to work, to go out with friends and to go on lots of long or short rides. However, it wasn’t mine, it was on loan.

Thanks to this bike, however, I started to get a better understanding of what it’s like to ride a bike, to keep up a certain rhythm and not to just go around hoping that things will always go well.

Suzuki DR 600 S

It was a “real” bike, I made my first ascent of the Stelvio pass with it.

I began to make real long-range trips with it. In about 4 years I took it 100,000 km, totally different from the Vespa.

Now I learned about maintenance, the essential basics, and how to ride a bike that weighed around 150 kg. In short, with this bike I got experience with a much heavier and more demanding bike.

BMW R 1200 GS std

I realised that the best engine to make the trips I intended (without motorways and sometimes on dirt roads) was a twin-cylinder, so I chose the R 1150 GS.

I didn’t buy the 1150 series because the 1200 series was coming out and I was captivated by the appealing aesthetics of the new version and by its lower weight.

I took my first solo trip with this, and I drove miles and miles with it over the course of nearly 3 years. However, there were a few too many problems so I was forced to sell it.

BMW R 1150 GS ADV

I decided that the 1150 series would be my choice; it was tried and tested, it was reliable, and it was also a perfect model in every sense.

It’s a heavy bike (it’s also known in Italy as “ghisa”, meaning “cast iron”). This photo shows it as I saw it in an advert; it was love at first sight.

I studied the bike very thoroughly; I wanted to find out everything that could possibly be known about it.

This is what I use for my travels at the moment and it’s so satisfying that I don’t feel the need to look for a more modern model.